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  • Ed Lundberg

Papyrus 52

The earliest known Greek New Testament manuscript is the Ryland Papyrus P52. This small fragment contains part of John 18:31-33 and was purchased in 1920 by Bernard Grenfell on the Egyptian antiquities market. It wasn’t until 1934 that the world came to recognize this fragment when it was translated by C. H. Roberts. Three of the leading papyrologists in Europe eventually dated this fragment from A.D. 100-150.


As of now there are over 5700 Greek manuscripts of the New Testament known to scholars. Many of these texts are small and fragmentary and are dated after the P52 fragment. To date there are no surviving original copies of any of the New Testament writings which are referred to as the ‘Original Autographs.’



…………………………………………………………………………………… until now!




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